In-Season Recipe (mid-August): Beans on the Barbie

This is one of the easiest and most practical ways to cook your garden wax beans, not to mention one of the most delicious.  As with my BBQed kale chips, when it’s too hot to turn on the oven I like to cook my beans on the barbie. This recipe works well with pretty much any bean you can grow. If you’ve got multiple varieties of beans, toss ‘em all in together. We’ve also been getting a lot of wicked veggies from “Grandpa” Frank, including a ton of yellow wax beans (included in photo below.)

Colourful bean mix, dill and coconut oil. Simple is best.

Colourful bean mix, dill and coconut oil. Simple is best.

We eat primarily vegetarian, so beans are an excellent home-grown source of protein for us. Here are the wax bean varieties we are growing this year and the source of the seeds:

- Kentucky Wonder yellow pole bean (Ferme Tourne-Sol)

- Rattlesnake green/purple pole bean (2012 seed harvest but originally from Ferme Tourne-Sol)

- Green bush bean (Seeds picked up while traveling in Bangladesh and planted for the first time in 2012 which have done very well in our backyard.)

- Purple pole bean (Seedlings traded from a friend earlier this year… excellent addition to our bean mix!)

We love our cast iron skillets (the original non-stick pan…) They can totally be used on the barbeque and are WAY more convenient than wrapping up your veggies in tin foil. (We do our roasted root veg this way too.) Not to mention that cooking with teflon and aluminum are not safe for you! Seriously… do some reading about it, and then go invest in a cast iron pan (or 2) if you don’t already have one. But I digress…

Here’s the recipe:

Preheat barbeque to medium heat. (If you’re cooking a number of different items on the barbeque, budget about 20 minutes for the beans.)

In a cast iron skillet, combine:

  • Mix of rinsed garden beans
  • Generous handful of fresh or dried garden dill
  • Generous tablespoon of coconut oil
  • A few cloves of coarsely chopped garlic
  • Pinch of sea salt

Cover the skillet with a cast iron of stainless steel lid (or foil if necessary) and put on the barbeque.

Toss beans every few minutes for even cooking. Beans are ready when they are soft and some are nicely browned.

Beany tips:

- The more you pick, the more they produce! Keep picking your beans regularly to keep them producing longer!

- If you have an over-abundance of beans, you can freeze them.

Say “Seeeeeeeds!”… Time for Seed Harvesting

Call it the “after thought harvest”… seed harvesting is not something that you might do or even think about if you are a newbie (or even seasoned) veggie grower. But if you don’t like forking out $3.50 a pack for organic seeds, then I suggest you give some thought, and a tiny bit of energy, to harvesting some seeds from your own crops to plant next year.

Dried arugula seeds and pods (2012 harvest)

Dried arugula seeds and pods (2012 harvest)

Of course each crop variety has a slightly different method for harvesting its seeds. In the case of “fruiting” crops, such as tomatoes, peppers, cucumbers, zucchini and pumpkins, the seeds are inside of the fruit, so must therefore be harvested from a picked fruit. I will leave those to a separate blog post later in the season… for now, let’s consider legumes and leafy crops, since that is what we’re harvesting right now.

Legumes (i.e. beans and peas) are the absolute simplest seed to harvest. Just allow a few of your pea and bean pods to fully mature and dry out on the vine. Harvest only after the pods are fully dried. A word of caution – don’t allow too many beans to fully mature off the bat or you will reduce the output of your plants. In the case of beans and peas, the more you pick, the more they produce! So wait until the plants are getting close to the end of their productive life before allowing pods to fully mature for seed harvesting. We have had excellent results with all peas and beans to date!

Dried pea pod on the vine.

Dried pea pod on the vine.

Harvested dried peas (2013 harvest)

Harvested dried peas (2013 harvest)

In the case of leafy crops the concept is simple – allow some of each crop to bolt, flower and go to seed, then allow the seeds to dry on the live plant before harvesting. I really cannot stress enough the importance of allowing the seed pods to dry fully on the plant before harvesting. If harvested too soon, the seeds may not be viable, or they may be difficult to store without rotting. This takes patience! For the last month we have been annoyingly stepping around a tangle of bolted cilantro to water our swiss chard, biding our time til the seeds are fully dried and ready to harvest… all for the love of sweet, sweet crushed coriander seed. (In the case of coriander, we save a few seeds for planting, but we use it religiously in all sorts of cooking.)

Cilantro (coriander) seeds... almost dry!

Cilantro (coriander) seeds… almost dry!

Over the last few years, we have had really good results harvesting seeds from the following leafy crops: all lettuces (… and did you know that lettuce plants have beautiful yellow flowers when they bolt?); spinach; arugula; dill; cilantro; and basil.

Once you have harvested the dried seed pods from the plant, release the individual seeds by rolling the pods between your thumb and fingers, gently crushing the dried pod. Place your harvested seeds in paper envelopes; I would advice against plastic since trapped humidity can make your seeds rot. Label, and store for next year in a cool, dry place. If you’re feeling particularly crafty, make yourself a cute seed box to keep them all in …

Say Seeeeds!

Say Seeeeds!

FYI, to date, we have not had any success harvesting seeds from kale, although recently I started chatting with a man on an airplane who turned out to run a small cooperative farm. He said that you can totally harvest kale seeds, and that they are good for eating as a nutrient-packed sprouted seed! We are definitely going to try this in the fall… will keep you posted on that one.

 

In-Season Recipe (early August): Simple “Sushi Style” Edamame

Edamame 2

Edamame beans with sea salt and sesame oil. Simply delicious.

According to Occam’s Razor, the simplest solution is often the right one. That is certainly true in the case of cooking edamame (aka soy) beans! They are, in my humble opinion, best eaten on their own, prepared in the simple style that is typically served as an appetizer in Japanese restaurants.

Edamame on bush

That’s a lotta beans for one little bush!

This is our first year growing edamame, but it won’t be our last. We planted 6, spaced amongst the peppers. Each sturdy plant has produced a hefty harvest, and no sign of disease or insect damage whatsoever. Edamame freeze really well, so our plan is to freeze whatever we don’t eat this season… although based on how quickly these beans were gobbled up tonight, I’m not sure there will be any left to freeze!

Here’s how I prepared them:

  • Place beans, in pods, in a pot of boiling, salted water.
  • Cook about 5 minutes.
  • Drain water and toss beans in dollop of sesame oil and a sprinkle of sea salt.
  • Serve immediately. (Don’t forget the side bowl to discard the pods.)

So good, we’ll probably eat them again tomorrow night. Enjoy!