It’s a little seedy around here

At this time of year, I get a lot of people asking me the same question when I tell them about the vegetable garden: “Where do you get your seeds?” In case you are also interested in the answer to this question, dear reader, I will tell you. There are the several places we get our seeds…

First of all, as much as possible we harvest seeds from our own garden for future planting. To date we’ve had success doing this with peas, beans, peppers, basil, cilantro, cantaloupe, lettuce, spinach and arugula. (Stay tuned this summer for a video blog series dedicated to showing you how to harvest from various crops.)

Hands down the best seed-buying event in Ottawa is Seedy Saturday – an event held in early March each year where numerous local (ON and QC) organic farms sell their seeds. For the last three years we have come home from this event with way more seeds than we planned from several of the farmers selling there, and have yet to be disappointed. The event also has a seed exchange table (i.e. FREE seeds if you have something to contribute to the table), some highly instructional gardening workshops and all sorts of scrumptious artisanal goodies to be found. Check out the Ecology Ottawa website for next year’s date.

Sugar snap pea seeds

Sugar snap peas from Ferme Tourne-Sol

There is one farm from which we’ve had some particularly incredible seeds: Ferme Tourne-Sol co-operative farm (les Cèdres, QC.) We have tried several of their tomatoes, beans, lettuce, peas, radishes, carrots and kale and everything has been very well germinating and producing. If you missed them at Seedy Saturday you can always order seeds from their website.

We are trying some fun potatoes this year! We have ordered four different varieties of fingerling potatoes from Bryson Farm.

We’ve also had good results with seeds from Greta’s Organic Gardens (Gloucester, ON) and Urban Harvest (Toronto, ON.)

Finally, I have been know to pick up certain herbs (rosemary, thyme, dill, chives) at the Parkdale Market, where you can often buy 3 plants for $5.

So, you could say we are not really one to buy seeds at Canadian Tire, preferring to take time to choose seeds that are heirloom as often as possible, and from organic producers. BUT, if that is what is easiest for you in order to get growing, then what better way to spend your CT dollars!