In-Season Recipe (mid-August): Beans on the Barbie

This is one of the easiest and most practical ways to cook your garden wax beans, not to mention one of the most delicious.  As with my BBQed kale chips, when it’s too hot to turn on the oven I like to cook my beans on the barbie. This recipe works well with pretty much any bean you can grow. If you’ve got multiple varieties of beans, toss ‘em all in together. We’ve also been getting a lot of wicked veggies from “Grandpa” Frank, including a ton of yellow wax beans (included in photo below.)

Colourful bean mix, dill and coconut oil. Simple is best.

Colourful bean mix, dill and coconut oil. Simple is best.

We eat primarily vegetarian, so beans are an excellent home-grown source of protein for us. Here are the wax bean varieties we are growing this year and the source of the seeds:

- Kentucky Wonder yellow pole bean (Ferme Tourne-Sol)

- Rattlesnake green/purple pole bean (2012 seed harvest but originally from Ferme Tourne-Sol)

- Green bush bean (Seeds picked up while traveling in Bangladesh and planted for the first time in 2012 which have done very well in our backyard.)

- Purple pole bean (Seedlings traded from a friend earlier this year… excellent addition to our bean mix!)

We love our cast iron skillets (the original non-stick pan…) They can totally be used on the barbeque and are WAY more convenient than wrapping up your veggies in tin foil. (We do our roasted root veg this way too.) Not to mention that cooking with teflon and aluminum are not safe for you! Seriously… do some reading about it, and then go invest in a cast iron pan (or 2) if you don’t already have one. But I digress…

Here’s the recipe:

Preheat barbeque to medium heat. (If you’re cooking a number of different items on the barbeque, budget about 20 minutes for the beans.)

In a cast iron skillet, combine:

  • Mix of rinsed garden beans
  • Generous handful of fresh or dried garden dill
  • Generous tablespoon of coconut oil
  • A few cloves of coarsely chopped garlic
  • Pinch of sea salt

Cover the skillet with a cast iron of stainless steel lid (or foil if necessary) and put on the barbeque.

Toss beans every few minutes for even cooking. Beans are ready when they are soft and some are nicely browned.

Beany tips:

- The more you pick, the more they produce! Keep picking your beans regularly to keep them producing longer!

- If you have an over-abundance of beans, you can freeze them.

In-Season Recipe (early August): Barbequed Kale Chips

I can’t believe I haven’t posted this recipe earlier, because I literally make kale chips at least 3 times a week. We can’t get enough of it here. Even our 10-month old daughter loves crispy kale chips!

Sophia loves kale chips!

Sophia loves kale chips!

We have three varieties of kale in the garden this year:

The Vates Blue Curled has proven to be a wonderful, robust variety for cooking with. The curly leaves hold their integrity much better than the other two when cooking. The Red Russian has produced very well; with its flat broad-leaves, this one is nice to harvest young to add to salads.

Early August kale harvest

Early August kale harvest

Kale is so wonderfully good for you – high in B vitamins, antioxidants, iron, calcium, fibre, omega 3s. just to name a few of the many benefits of eating this “queen of greens.” It is delicious sauteed with a little garlic to go with your morning eggs, blended into smoothies, cooked into omelettes, chopped into salads and baked with other veggies. But in my opinion, there is no better way to eat it than to turn it onto crispy kale chips… on the BBQ!

Yep, you read correctly, I make these on the que. In the hot summer months, who wants to turn their oven on?

Here’s what you need to make the basic version of BBQed kale chips:

  • A few nice mitt-fulls of fresh kale (curled variety preferred)
  • A couple table spoons Olive oil
  • 1/2 teaspoon sea salt
  • A few tablespoons of Nutritional yeast.(Nutritional yeast is high in B vitamins, protein and iron! It is low sodium and gives things a nutty delicious flavour… amazing addition to salad dressings! I buy it at Herb and Spice.)
  • Handful of pine nuts, if desired.

    Nutritional yeast adds a yummy nutty flavour and is high in B vitamins.

    Nutritional yeast adds a yummy nutty flavour and is high in B vitamins.

Here’s how to do it:

  • Wash your kale if necessary (and dry thoroughly!) and tear into large pieces (I usually just tear leaves in 2 or 3)
  • Toss kale in olive oil, coating well.
  • Toss in the nutritional yeast and sea salt (and pine nuts, if using.) I never measure this stuff… it’s all about experimenting with quantities o see what you like.
  • Spread out the kale on a baking sheet.
  • Place on a BBQ on low heat.
  • “Bake” 5-10 minutes, turning frequently! Kale will burn VERY quickly if you don’t keep a close eye on it.
  • Chips are done when kale is crispy but not dried out or overly browned.
  • Serve immediately, as an appetizer or snack. I find these are perfect to serve as a nibbly when you’re barbequing other things.

    kale on BBQ

    Kale on the barbie.

Try experimenting with all sorts of seasonings. Another blend we really like uses sesame oil, sesame seeds and a dash of tamari… go nuts! There really is no wrong way to do kale chips. Drooool.

Barbequed kale chips with pine nuts.

Barbequed kale chips with pine nuts.

 

 

In-Season Recipe (early August): Simple “Sushi Style” Edamame

Edamame 2

Edamame beans with sea salt and sesame oil. Simply delicious.

According to Occam’s Razor, the simplest solution is often the right one. That is certainly true in the case of cooking edamame (aka soy) beans! They are, in my humble opinion, best eaten on their own, prepared in the simple style that is typically served as an appetizer in Japanese restaurants.

Edamame on bush

That’s a lotta beans for one little bush!

This is our first year growing edamame, but it won’t be our last. We planted 6, spaced amongst the peppers. Each sturdy plant has produced a hefty harvest, and no sign of disease or insect damage whatsoever. Edamame freeze really well, so our plan is to freeze whatever we don’t eat this season… although based on how quickly these beans were gobbled up tonight, I’m not sure there will be any left to freeze!

Here’s how I prepared them:

  • Place beans, in pods, in a pot of boiling, salted water.
  • Cook about 5 minutes.
  • Drain water and toss beans in dollop of sesame oil and a sprinkle of sea salt.
  • Serve immediately. (Don’t forget the side bowl to discard the pods.)

So good, we’ll probably eat them again tomorrow night. Enjoy!

 

In-Season Recipe (early July): Garlic Scape, Basil & Kale Pesto

Fresh batch of scape, kale and basil pesto. Does it get any more delicious?

Fresh batch of scape, kale and basil pesto. Does it get any more delicious?

It’s scape season! Well, the tail end of it anyway. We have been loving using garlic scapes in place of garlic bulb for the last few weeks. FYI, for those who don’t know, the scape is a long curly stalk at the end of which grows the garlic flower. Scapes are harvested before the garlic actually flowers to encourage the garlic to direct energy to the bulb. And they are delicious. We’ve been putting them in curries, omelettes, stir fries, roasted veg, salads, marinades… you name it!

Curly garlic scapes, ripe for the picking (early July.)

Curly garlic scapes, ripe for the picking (early July.)

But the pièce de résistance has got to be the pesto. We harvested all of the remaining scapes in one big bundle to be sacrificed to the food processor gods to become a few precious jars of garlicy, basily, nutty goodness.

Pesto is a cinch to make. Here’s how I did this batch. (Note that all measurements are approximate… it’s all up to your tastes.)

Put the following in a food processor and blend until smooth:

- 2 cups garlic scapes (chop off the little seed pods first)

- 1 cup chopped kale

- 1 cup chopped basil

- 1 cup lightly roasted pine nuts

- 1 cup lightly roasted walnuts

- 1.5 -2 cups grated parmesan cheese

- 1 generous cup olive oil

- juice of at least 1 lemon (more if you love a lemon zing in your pesto)

- Lots of cracked pepper and dash of sea salt, to taste

This recipe yielded about 6 small jars, but it was so good that Benny insisted on snacking on it immediately with some tortilla chips (as pictured above.) You will too. Freeze what you aren’t using immediately. These small jars make awesome leave-behind gifts if you’re going to a friend’s for dinner or visiting a friend with a new baby.

While pesto is typically made with basil, I used a combination of garden kale and basil in this batch and it worked out famously. We are growing three varieties of kale:

Red Russian and Blue Curled kale (early July.)

Red Russian and Blue Curled kale (early July.)

We have four varieties of basil growing this year, although I must admit that I did buy some basil transplants at the Parkdale Market to supplement the rather meager number of basil seedlings that germinated indoors (from seeds harvested in 2012.) I think we have a Thai, an Italian, a purple leaf and a Greek basil.

In-Season Recipe (early June): Spring Mix Salad with Shaved Radish and Baked Goat’s Cheese Medallions

Spring mix salad served with portabello mushroom and asparagus fritatta. Spring eating at it's best.

Spring mix salad served with portabello mushroom and asparagus fritatta. Spring eating at it’s best.

Randy for radishes!

Randy for radishes!

Early season harvests are the best!… tender greens, baby spinach, crisp spring onion and the pièce de résistance – ravishing ripe red radishes. Planted in early April, these tangy, peppery little delights are now ready for the picking… and the eating! It’s so tempting to eat them right out of the ground, with just a wipe on the shirt sleeve to clean them off. But they are also amazing in a salad of fresh garden greens.

Here is a delicious and simple recipe that is a perfect way to enjoy early season greens and radishes. Serve this as a light meal or as a side. It’s pictured above paired with a portabello mushroom and asparagus frittata. Enjoy!

Spring Mix Salad with Shaved Radish and Baked Goat’s Cheese Medallions

For goat’s cheese medallions:

  • Soft unripened goat’s cheese (quantity is up to you!)
  • Egg, beaten in a bowl
  • A couple handfuls of bread crumbs on a plate. (If you’re eating gluten-free, try using some ground flax and cornmeal, or whatever “breading” substitute you are using.)
  • Olive oil.

Gooey baked goat's cheese. Drool!Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. Generously grease a baking pan with olive oil. Shape goat’s cheese into 1tbsp sized medallions. One-by-one, dip medallions into the beaten egg and then press lightly into the breadcrumbs, making sure they’re well-coated. Place medallions on the baking pan. Bake for approx. 15 minutes, flipping once. They’re ready when golden brown on the outside and gooey soft on the inside… Mmmmmm.

While goat’s cheese is baking, toss the following in a salad bowl:

Early June harvest basket.

Early June harvest basket.

From the garden:

  • Assorted lettuce (Jericho Romaine, Red Oak Leaf and Curly Green Leaf)
  • Giant Winter spinach
  • Astro Arugula
  • Bunching spring onion
  • Cilantro
  • Raxe radishes, finely “shaved” using a carrot peeler, or chopped very thinly
  • Walnuts (or any nut you have in your cupboard)

For the vinaigrette:

  • 2-3 tbsp Olive oil
  • 1-2 tbsp balsamic vinegar (I used a raspberry balsamic)
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • tsp honey
  • tsp grainy mustard
  • sea salt and cracked pepper to taste

As soon as goat’s cheese medallions are done, toss salad in the vinaigrette and top with 2-3 medallions. Drizzle with balsamic glaze if you have it.